Week 6 Blog Post

  Part One: The framing of Maori visual and material culture by predominantly western accounts highlights Europeans’ dominant position in New Zealand society and their role in constructing its history. According to Anderson, contemporary western accounts are very limited due to geographic restrictions, the shrouding of religion, the language barrier and a disinterest in domestic…

Week 5 Blog Task

Chapter nine in Tangata Whenua discusses the wars that ravaged New Zealand from the 1960’s into the 1970’s. Following the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, there was growing tension around issues of authority as Maori wished to safeguard their rangatiratanga, whilst the Crown was determined to establish sovereignty – often using questionable policies to do so. Throughout these wars allegiances, between…

Week 4 Blog Task

Part One: Tapu is one of the strongest and most respected forces in Maori culture. It is a spiritual code, and according to Mead, “the source of tapu goes to the heart of Maori religious thought” (30). The concept of tapu denotes sacredness and discipline – with strict rules and ceremonies existing around it. Tapu exists…

Week 3 Blog Task

  This is the outside of an unfinished pātaka (food store house) built around 1750. Originally it stood in Maraenui until it was taken apart and hidden in caves near Te Kaha. The carving on this pātaka relates to the period Te Puawaitanga, The Flowering, (1500-1800AD) in New Zealand art history – which coincides with the…

Week 2 Blog Task

  This disc pendant, found at Okains Bay, Canterbury, is an example of early New Zealand jewellery. The first settlers in New Zealand, and other Pacific Islands, voyaged from Southeast Asia in large boats (Anderson 38). This piece refers to the early Tangata Whenua’s past and present. It shows the settlers’ cultural traditions adapting to suit…