Week 11 Blog Post

Atea refers to the meeting of people and ideas in a shared space, whilst acknowledging and following the tikanga associated with that space. This work was intended to communicate the ‘surfing’ subculture within New Zealand. This relates to the concept of Atea as a subculture is the meeting of individuals who share values, beliefs and interests, and…

Week 10 Blog Post

Part One: When asked where I call home I automatically reply New Zealand. In response, I receive betrayed, shocked looks from grandparents who assume that after fourteen years of living the ‘Kiwi’ childhood I would still call South Africa home. Upon reflection, I have realised that I no longer associate myself with South Africa –…

Week 9 Blog Post

Part 1: Part 2: Stereotypes have facilitated the restriction and construction of Maori identity as well as heightening racial discourse within New Zealand. Wall discusses the stereotype of Maori as the primitive natural athlete, a stereotype which emerged as a justification of the Crown’s conquest of New Zealand – in terms of portraying Maori as…

Week 8 Blog Post

Part One: Evan’s cartoon, created for a New Zealand newspaper, depicts a group of frightened children with a large dark figure looming behind them with the word poverty emblazoned on his front. The imagery is suggestive of the beheading of westerners by Isis. In 2014, the countering Terrorist Fighters Legislation Bill had been passed and the…

Week 7 Blog Post

Part 1: Paraphrase an academic source in relation to Week 7 Lecture A theme discussed in this week’s lecture was Pacific Methodologies and their place in an academic setting. Konai Helu Thaman discusses the decolonisation of Pacific studies in an article published by the University of Hawai’i. She discusses intellectual colonisation of the Pacific and how…

Week 6 Blog Post

  Part One: The framing of Maori visual and material culture by predominantly western accounts highlights Europeans’ dominant position in New Zealand society and their role in constructing its history. According to Anderson, contemporary western accounts are very limited due to geographic restrictions, the shrouding of religion, the language barrier and a disinterest in domestic…

Week 5 Blog Task

Chapter nine in Tangata Whenua discusses the wars that ravaged New Zealand from the 1960’s into the 1970’s. Following the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, there was growing tension around issues of authority as Maori wished to safeguard their rangatiratanga, whilst the Crown was determined to establish sovereignty – often using questionable policies to do so. Throughout these wars allegiances, between…

Week 4 Blog Task

Part One: Tapu is one of the strongest and most respected forces in Maori culture. It is a spiritual code, and according to Mead, “the source of tapu goes to the heart of Maori religious thought” (30). The concept of tapu denotes sacredness and discipline – with strict rules and ceremonies existing around it. Tapu exists…

Week 3 Blog Task

  This is the outside of an unfinished pātaka (food store house) built around 1750. Originally it stood in Maraenui until it was taken apart and hidden in caves near Te Kaha. The carving on this pātaka relates to the period Te Puawaitanga, The Flowering, (1500-1800AD) in New Zealand art history – which coincides with the…

Week 2 Blog Task

  This disc pendant, found at Okains Bay, Canterbury, is an example of early New Zealand jewellery. The first settlers in New Zealand, and other Pacific Islands, voyaged from Southeast Asia in large boats (Anderson 38). This piece refers to the early Tangata Whenua’s past and present. It shows the settlers’ cultural traditions adapting to suit…

Publishable Blog Post Four – Final

As consumers we are completely removed from the iniquitous conditions our clothes are produced in, through my piece (Fig. 1) I hope to help viewers bridge this gap. Workers in developing countries labour in overcrowded, hot and structurally unstable buildings for excessive hours – often working eighteen-hour days (Clean Clothes Campaign). They are deprived of…

Publishable Blog Post Three

An effective piece of visual activism is specific enough that viewers feel they can help enact change, rather than being overwhelmed by the problem’s scale. I began researching labour trafficking into the fashion industry, due to this industry’s scale and relevance to us all, and was devastated at the conditions most of our clothes are produced…